Families of 9/11 victims sue Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia Wants Trump to Drop 9/11 Terror Victims LawMore
Saudi Arabia Wants Trump to Drop 9/11 Terror Victims LawMore
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25 March, 2017

Of the 19 hijackers that allegedly carried out the 9/11 attacks, 15 were Saudi nationals and available evidence suggests some of them were linked to high-ranking Saudi officials.

The new lawsuit was filed by filed by Kreindler & Kreindler out of NY, and although the amount of sought-after damages has not been revealed, the lawsuit is sure to cause ripples.

According to the broadcaster, the complaint cited Federal Bureau of Investigation and Central Intelligence Agency reports that found some of the attackers had received support from individuals allegedly connected to the Saudi government.

Hundreds of relatives of individuals killed in the September 11, 2001, attacks have sued Saudi Arabia in USA court, seeking to take advantage of a law passed by Congress past year that allows victims of such attacks on U.S. soil to sue state sponsors. It seeks unspecified damages.

Mr Kreindler added: "This lawsuit is a demonstration of the unwavering commitment of the 9/11 families to hold Saudi Arabia accountable for its critical role in the 9/11 attacks".

Former President Barack ObamaBarack Obama9/11 victims suing Saudi Arabia: report THE MEMO: Five takeaways from Comey's big day FBI investigating Trump-Russia ties MORE vetoed the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA) last September, arguing it would undermine sovereign immunity. The law was primarily meant to aid 9/11 families who were previously stymied by USA sovereign immunity laws for foreign governments.

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The suit follows a congressional override of then-President Barack Obama's veto in September, which enacted a law allowing an exception to the legal principle of sovereign immunity in cases of terrorism on U.S. soil.

Among other allegations, the complaint accuses Saudi officials of being aware that money was redirected from Saudi charities to al Qaida to fund their attacks.

The families say Saudi Arabia's support of the organization directly caused the deaths of more than 3,000 people.

In addition, the lawsuit also argued the September 11 attacks were not possible without the involvement of the Saudi royal family.

Michael Kellogg, a Washington-based lawyer representing the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, did not respond to a message left at his office Monday evening. The suit also targets U.S. officials who provided cover for Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden and his followers.

Those pages indicate that several actors within the Saudi government had connections to the hijackers.


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